Reach Teach Sell

Reach Teach Sell is a handy framework for practical marketing.

That’s where it began, anyway. 🤔

I started hacking on Reach Teach Sell several years ago. It was a way to wrap my head around how Content Marketing could address different parts of the customer journey.

As time went on, I realized it was even applicable to Product and Community programs.

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Pivoting to Product Management

I pivoted from Marketing Manager to Product Manager in September.

The thought of changing jobs crept up early this year — or late last year, I can’t quite remember — thanks to a suggestion from my manager.

I was reluctant at first. I’d never held a Product title before. I wasn’t sure if I was even qualified. But my manager encouraged me to keep thinking about it.

“You’re such a product guy.”

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The power in paper sketching

From Tracy Osborn via Smashing Mag:

“The power in paper sketching is the sketch’s ephemerality and how they feel less “real” than anything we create quickly on a computer. Start moving words and buttons around on a computer screen, and it’s tempting to fall into a certain direction and never explore alternate paths. Paper sketches force our imagination to fill in the gaps — far more quickly than if we added those details to a computer mockup.”

I keep a pad of graph paper on my desk. I use it for everything – scribbled notes, conceptual diagrams, little doodles, etc. Starting with paper is the best way to really grok something, before digitizing it for posterity and sharing.

Your curiosity budget

From the latest Product Lessons newsletter:

“Productivity is a double-edged sword. Focusing only on doing more things turns into a quest of finding the easiest boxes to check. It makes you over-optimize for the short-term. A useful antidote is carving out a curiosity budget: time to explore new things.”

The idea comes Scott Belsky, co-creator of Behance. I dig it.

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Planning horizons & cycle time

From Andrew “Boz” Bosworth at Facebook:

The fundamental lesson here is that for any repeating process it is important to consider both planning horizons and cycle time and the impact those have on the incentives they create for teams. When possible, having transparency about long term schedules and more continuous evaluation processes will remove gamesmanship from the equation and allow teams to focus primarily on the problem they are trying to solve.”

The Last Bus Problem (Boz)

Ship small. Ship often.