What do you want to accomplish?

Knowing what you want to accomplish should help you determine which tasks are most relevant. This will take time and discipline. You need to stop hiding from discomfort and do the hard work. Which tasks matter most? Find out, and act on those. In doing so, you should see greater progress than you did when you were busy doing everything.

Source: Slow the fuck down

Counterpoint: When you’re just starting out, chances are you don’t know what you want to accomplish.

You gotta try different things until you hit that sweet spot of what you’re good at, what you enjoy, and what other people find valuable enough to pay you for.

Product management for SMB marketing websites?

A distinction we like to highlight at Postlight is that a product manager is not a project manager. Don’t get me wrong. Project management is important. But the focus is too often on maintaining a process, not shipping a product. That’s sensible on big projects, but less useful when you need to bring a product into the light. Product managers get in there. Moving things around. Dropping things off. Explaining to the team that the research doesn’t support this tactical move or that. My co-founder Paul Ford says that a good product manager has a crooked index finger from hitting “Command-R” to reload a web app tens of thousands of times. I think that’s right — you’re looking for that person willing to obsessively look at tiny changes until the entire picture of the product comes into view.

Source: What Makes a Good Product Manager?

Tangent time.

Lately I’ve been thinking about SMB marketing websites & eCommerce websites in the context of product management.

You have all the ingredients of a web app. There are UX considerations, performance considerations, back-end logic and infrastructure considerations, user stories and jobs-to-be-done.

(Isn’t monthly unique traffic similar enough to MAUs?)

So, along that train of thought… I wonder what principles we can borrow from product management and apply to SMB marketing & eComm websites?

(Aside: I’m a big fan of Postlight. You should read their blog and subscribe to their podcast.)

“Content so good you could sell ads against it.”

The distribution of content by consumer brands has become more diffuse over the past few year, yet branded content is still in its nascence. Mariah predicts that brands will get into the content game in a far more pronounced way—creating content that would not be a branded advertorial piece, but content so good that advertising could be sold against it.

Source: 4 Ways Digital Retail Will Evolve in the Next Five Years | Custora Blog

As they should. (If you don’t care about your content quality, who will?)