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@andymci

A perspective on content, community and the web.

If you want to be the best at anything, you need to be the best at practicing and iterating more than anyone else and knowing when to let go. Perfection is an endless productivity loop.

Source: Want to be a Creative Genius? Your Goal Should be Progress, Not Perfection – The Mission – Medium

Customization at a lower cost. 

Why do people want page builders? Simple. They offer customers a solution for personalization that mass-produced themes can’t offer, while at a lower price than working with a professional web developer and web designer.

Source: Why customers want WordPress Page Builders

Page builders are also great for prototyping or building simple websites with minimal resources. Could I craft a custom theme? Certainly. But why would I, when I can grab a plugin and build what I want in a fraction of the time?

Best practices of the web community.

But let’s be honest—there are a lot of areas to focus on. We need to put users first, content first, and mobile first. We need to design for accessibility, performance, and empathy. We need to tune and test our work across many devices and browsers. Our content needs to grab user attention, speak inclusively, and employ appropriate keywords for SEO optimization. We should write semantic markup and comment our code for the developers who come after us.

As I speak with development shops and ask about their code standards, workflows, and methods for maintaining consistency and best practices across distributed development teams, I’m continually astonished to hear that often, most of the best practices I listed in the first paragraph are not part of any development project unless the client specifically asks for them.

If I want to build a house, I’m going to hire experts to design and build that house. I will have to rely on architects, builders, and contractors to know what material to use for the foundation, where to construct load-bearing walls, and where to put the plumbing and electricity. I don’t know the building codes and requirements to ensure that my house will withstand a storm. I don’t even know what questions I would need to ask to find out. I need to rely on experts to design and build a structure that won’t fall down—and then I’ll spend my time picking out paint colors and finding a rug to tie the room together.

Source: Insisting on Core Development Principles · An A List Apart Article

Sprints and work don’t go together.

I despise the word sprints. Sprints and work don’t go together. This isn’t about running all out as fast as you can, it’s about working calmly, at a nice pace, and making smart calls along the way. No brute force here, no catching our collective breath at the end.

Source: How we structure our work and teams at Basecamp

Unless you have regulatory reasons to do so (SEC Reg FD, FINRA, FFIEC, etc.), there’s no longer a reason to send out press releases. No one is reading them, no one is engaging with them, and they offer no search marketing benefit to you. You’re almost certainly getting no ROI from your spend, and you could spend that money elsewhere, like on social media content amplification, syndication, or original content creation.

Source: Press Releases Don’t Work – SHIFT Communications PR Agency – Boston | New York | San Francisco | Austin

If you can look at personal projects as investments offering long-term benefits, you’ll find that they are an important part of your growth and development. They provide value in many forms, from a potential future commission to bolstering your artistic toolkit to giving you the freedom to run wild with your beloved, batty ideas, unafraid of a client’s critique.

Source: The 5 Types of Personal Projects (And How You Can Justify Pursuing Them) – 99U