Balancing hope, cynicism, and critical thought.

Finding fault and feeling hopeless about improving the situation produces resignation — cynicism is both resignation’s symptom and a futile self-protection mechanism against it. Blindly believing that everything will work out just fine also produces resignation, for we have no motive to apply ourselves toward making things better. But in order to survive — both as individuals and as a civilization — and especially in order to thrive, we need the right balance of critical thinking and hope.

via Some Thoughts on Hope, Cynicism, and the Stories We Tell Ourselves | Brain Pickings.

Changing the way we talk about accessibility.

Not “people with disabilities.” Not “blind people and deaf people.” Not “people who have cognitive disabilities” or “men who are color blind” or “people with motor disabilities.” People. People who are using the web. People who are using what you’re building.

via Reframing Accessibility for the Web · An A List Apart Article.

Accessibility was a big focus for us at WordCamp Toronto 2014. We’re continuing to make it a focus of what we’re doing in Toronto’s WordPress community.

A radical idea: free money.

Between 1974 and 1979, the Canadian government tested the idea of a basic income guarantee (BIG) across an entire town, giving people enough money to survive in a way that no other place in North America has before or since. For those four years—until the project was cancelled and its findings packed away—the town’s poorest residents were given monthly checks that supplemented what modest earnings they had and rewarded them for working more. And for that time, it seemed that the effects of poverty began to melt away. Doctor and hospital visits declined, mental health appeared to improve, and more teenagers completed high school.

via The Town Where Everyone Got Free Money | Motherboard.